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Showing posts from January, 2017

Be Humble

Some of the best developers I know treat everyone with mutual respect. Not only this they are open about what they do know and what they don't know. In fact they'll often proclaim I don't know and go about finding out how they can answer your question or solve a particular problem.ExampleA past mentor of mine had a wealth of experience in both the domain and software development itself. In contrast I had no domain experience and very limited practical ability. Despite this gap I was treated as they would treat an equal. No matter how stupid or basic my questions.However our roles switched one day when I explained about my background in games programming. My mentor decided to have a go, a topic on which he knew nothing. He was both humble and happy to be led and openly admitted his shortcomings. In the end we were able to build a basic game. Here I answered what I considered basic questions, while he gained experience.Opposite ExampleOn the other hand some of the worst deve…

Convention Based Tests

Most projects have some form of convention. Examples would include:Attributes/Properties for REST API'sInheritance for third party base typesAssemblies/Packages for third party code that is loaded dynamicallyFolder or namespace conventionsAnd many other forms of conventionsIn a few of these examples static analysis can detect issues, but the majority of these problems would resolve only at runtime.A technique I've used in the past to great success is the concept of convention based tests (CBT). These are tests that ensure a particular convention is followed. As a general practice CBT tend to be written after the discovery of a problem as it is preferable to rely upon higher level tests initially. The good news is that CBT ensure that such problems never return and if a convention is broken you'll be notified during your test run.In terms of quantity there will be a very small number of these tests, and unlike typical tests that focus on behaviour rather than implementation…

Finance For Software Developers

Back at the start of 2016 I set about sorting my personal finances out, inspired by Soft Skills. The book makes a point to consider passive income as a viable solution to wealth building. The reason for this is simple, software developers tend to get paid well if working professionally. Like most professionals though, during school or university you won't be guided on how to handle money until you are thrown into the deep end.Assets and LiabilitiesAt the start of February we listed all our assets versus liabilities and were rather shocked. Our net worth (assets minus liabilities) was negative. Not only was it negative, it was negative by a rather large number. This scary realisation forced us down the path of personal finance. Most of this knowledge came from a handful of books and took no more than a few months to really get to grips with the basics. For the small cost of a few books and your time the return on this investment is huge. In summary you want to maximize assets (thin…